Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Mae West: Adoring Esquires

The Australian fans of MAE WEST were eagerly anticipating her latest film in late August.
• • Mae West in "Every Day's a Holiday" • •
• • Mae West  goes back to her favourite period, the nineties of last century, for her latest film, "Every Day's a Holiday," a Paramount picture. It has a steady flow of Westian wit, such as "Let joy be unrefined," with a plot that gives the comedienne large scope. She has surrounded herself with an imposing array of male comedy talent, including Walter Catlett, Charles Butterworth, and Charles Winninger, and has included Edmund Lowe for romantic appeal, so that the film will not disappoint even the most critical of her admirers.
• • With a train of adoring esquires • •
• • Peaches O'Day (Mae West) comes to town in defiance of police orders to arrest her on sight, and successfully sells the Brooklyn Bridge to an unsuspecting foreigner, burgles a shop window, invades fashionable Rector's restaurant with a train of adoring esquires, and generally sets a lively pace for all concerned.
• • Handsome Captain McCarey (Edmund Lowe), of the police force, refrains from arresting her because he Is infatuated by her seductive charm. The comedy takes a new turn when Peaches, after an enforced absence from town, returns disguised as a French brunette, Mlle. Fifi, and takes a devastating revenge on her arch-enemy Inspector Quade (Lloyd Nolan).
• • Source: Article in The Queenslander (Brisbane); published on Wednesday, 31 August 1938.
• • On Monday, 28 August 1933 in Hollywood Reporter • •
• • According to a news item in The Hollywood Reporter published on Monday, 28 August 1933, Alexander Hall and George Somnes were set to co-direct the Mae West motion picture  "Belle of the Nineties."  However, these men were later replaced by Leo McCarey.
• • On Monday, 28 August 1939 in Life • •
• • Life Magazine's issue (dated 28 August 1939) included a half-page photo of Mae West.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • All in all the Mae West Revue is a show that is playing to capacity audiences every performance.  It is a show that is being acclaimed as the finest on any night club stage.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said:  “Loves conquers all things except poverty and toothache.”
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • An item in a California paper mentioned Mae West and omitted the name of George Raft.
• • Eagle Rock Advertiser wrote: At the York Theatre, Wednesday, Thursday — — Return Engagement — — Mae West in “Night After Night." 
• • Source: Item in Eagle Rock Advertiser (Eagle Rock, Calif); published on Monday, 28 August 1933 
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 10th anniversary • •    
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during this past decade. 
• • By the Numbers • • 
• • The Mae West Blog was started ten years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 2990th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

Source:http://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xmlAdd to Google

• • Photo:
• • Mae West in 1937

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Mae West: Witness Stand

MAE WEST was back in court in the last week of August 1948.
• • "Mae West 'Upset' On Witness Stand; Court Is Recessed" • •
• • LOS ANGELES, Aug. 26 (JF) — — A symmetrical, satin-clad Mae West, flared up on the witness stand today and the court was sufficiently impressed to call a recess until the blonde actress cooled off. The argument concerned the succession of lovers upon whom Czarina Catherine of Russia conferred her favors.
• • It might not seem important at this late date, but it appears to be an issue in the $100,000 plagiarism suit filed against the actress by two writers, Edwin K. O'Brien and Michael Kane. The writers' attorney was questioning Miss West about Prince Potemkin, Count Gregory Orloff, and one Alexis Orloff. She was asked where Potemkin figured in the line of Catherine's lovers.
• • Mae West said she couldn't see what difference it made, whether he was the first, the 10th, or the 100th.
• • "Well, it is going to matter before we get through," said' Henry T. Moore, representing the writers, "after more questioning,"
• • Miss West, 55 years old, turned to Superior Judge Samuel Blake and said: "I can't think, your honor. I'm too upset. Can we take a recess?"  The judge looked at the clock and said if Miss West was indeed angry and upset, then the court would take a recess. 
• • The writers allege that Miss West appropriated some of their material for her production "Catherine Was Great." Miss West testified earlier in the day that she had never seen the script from which the writers claim material was pirated.
• • Source: Syndicated article rpt on page 3 in Pottstown Mercury (Pottstown, Pennsylvania); published on Friday, 27 August 1948.
• • On Monday, 27 August 1934 • •
• • Film Daily wrote: About $15,000 in presents was passed around by Mae West to those who helped in the retakes of her new Paramount picture, "Belle of the Nineties."
• • Source: Article: "Mae West Plays Santa Claus'' written by the West Coast Bureau of The Film Daily, Hollywood, for Film Daily; published on 27 August 1934.
• • The L.A. Times printed a similar item on Monday, 27 August 1934.
• • On Friday, 27 August 1976 • •
• • The Times Sunday Review interviewed people who knew Mae West.
• • The actress had attended the theatre with friends and after the show they asked what she thought of it. And Mae had replied: "I kept concentrating on making my mind wander. It [the play] made me realize there's less to life than sex."
• • Source: The Times Sunday Review published in the UK on Friday, 27 August 1976.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • John O'Hara's "BUtterfield 8" (banned in 1950) and Mae West's "She Done Him Wrong" (banned in 1934) were the two memorable exceptions for the Australian Customs. The Appeals Board refused to reconsider these books.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said:  "I'm not making a comeback.  I never went away!"
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A footnote in a book on architecture mentioned Mae West.
• • For details on the deployment of Mae West, see Kenneth Anger, "Hollywood Babylon" (San Francisco: Straight Arrow Books, 1975).
• • Source: Book: "Eating Architecture" by Jamie Horwitz, ‎Paulette Singley; published in 2004
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 10th anniversary • •    
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during this past decade. 
• • By the Numbers • • 
• • The Mae West Blog was started ten years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 2989th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

Source:http://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xmlAdd to Google

• • Photo:
• • Mae West in 1948

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West

Monday, August 25, 2014

Mae West: New Style Siren

In August of 1976, a long interview with MAE WEST was published, timed for her birthday. Continued from last Thursday, the final excerpt from the exclusive feature by Hollywood correspondent Robert L. Rose is below.
• • "They still come up and see Mae West at home" • •
• • Written by Robert L. Rose (IUM News Service) • •
• • That was back in the early 1930s when Paramount brought her to Hollywood, an already established star of vaudeville and the legitimate stage, and in fact put her up in the very same apartment she occupies today — — 44 years later.
• • First she appeared in George Raft's first starring movie, "Night After Night," and it's her entrance that set her movie career on fire. She slowly and sexily saunters past a goggle-eyed hatcheck girl, who bursts out: "Goodness, what beautiful diamonds." Tosses off Mae, continuing up the staircase to see George Raft: "Goodness had nothing to do with it." In the same picture, she is asked, "Do you believe in love at first sight?" She replies, "I don't know. But it saves an awful lot of time." 
• • "this new-style Hollywood siren" • •
• • Audiences went wild over this new-style Hollywood siren. Before they had been sinister, and heavy. She was lighthearted, breezy, tough, dominating men with a wisecrack and a leer, and showing no guilt after straying, enthusiastically. "It wasn't what I did, but how I did it," she said.
• • The two Cary Grant pictures followed immediately, "She Done Him Wrong" and "I'm No Angel." She herself, as the famous story goes, accurately picked him when she saw him strolling down the studio street at Paramount. The producers protested he'd never even been in a movie, only tests. "Call him over," she insisted. "If he can talk, I'll take him. He'll do for my leading man." He came over, said "how do you do" with a charming accent and his career was launched. She also wrote both movies. In the first, Grant plays a Salvation Army type, actually a cop in disguise, trying to get the goods on Mae, a Bowery queen who lures men to her apartment to love and rob them (sic).
• • The punchlines: "When women go wrong, men go right after them."
• • Mae: I always did like a man in uniform, and that one fits you grand. Why don't you come up sometime and see me? I'm home every evening.
• • Cary: I'm busy every evening.
• • Mae: Come up ... I'll tell your fortune ... (As he departs) you can be had." Later Cary admires her jewelry. Mae: This is just my summer jewelry. Ya outha see my winter stuff.
• • Cary reveals himself as a cop, slaps handcuffs on her (later he gives her a ring) and she protests, "Are those absolutely necessary? I wasn't born with them."
• • Cary: All those men would have been a lot safer if you had.
• • Mae: I don't know ... Hands ain't everything.
• • In the same movie, suitor Kent Taylor tells her breathlessly, "You're dazzling, you're beautiful, you're gorgeous." Mae responds, "Wait a minute ... wait a minute ... Take it slower... "
• • Kent: Do you mind if I get personal?
• • Mae: I don't mind if you get familiar.
• • Another suitor in another movie, "Belle of the Nineties," is equally eager as he gasps, "I must have you, your golden hair, your fascinating eyes, your alluring smile, and lovely arms..."
• • Mae: Wait a minute. Is this a proposal or are ya takin' inventory?
• • This excerpt concludes the article written by Robert L. Rose.
• • Source: Independent Press-Telegram (Long Beach, California); published on Saturday, August 21, 1976.
• • On Friday, 26 August 1921 • •
• • "The Mimic World 1921" opened on 17 August 1921 and Jimmy Hussey's close friend, Jack Dempsey (another Irish-American) attended the premiere, and visited Mae West backstage after the show.
• • Clearly with Mae's approval and cooperation, Hussey penned the skit "The Trial of Shimmy Mae." Hussey himself played the judge as Mae demonstrated the shimmy in his topsy-turvy courtroom.
• • Variety tartly commented on 26 August 1921: "In a tent it would have been a riot."
• • On Thursday, 26 August 1954 • •
• • According to vintage newspaper ads, the roving "Mae West Revue" opened their performance schedule in Reno, Nevada starting on Thursday, 26 August 1954. 
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • An interview with Mae West quite naturally led to talk of sex, since she was the pioneer of more permissive entertainment.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said:  "The church people watched me like a hawk. Where are the church people today?"
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • An article in an Australian magazine focused on Mae West.
• • "Mae Gets Top Billing" • •
• • Don Prince wrote:  Interviewing Mae West is rather like talking with the Sphinx or warming up to the Mona Lisa. You are so filled with awe at conversing with one of the Wonders of the World, and with admiration of the ultimate in symbolic sex sorcery, that addlement may easily set in.
• • Don Prince wrote:  You are received at her apartment by Paul, La West's constant companion, champion, and confidant. Paul has the quiet assurance of an early Karloff and gives the impression that should you even think any harm to Mae he would easily turn into Cerebus and devour you with considerable gusto.    .  ...
• • Source:  Written by Don Prince for The Australian Women's Weekly; published on Wednesday, 1 July 1970 
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 10th anniversary • •    
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during this past decade. 
• • By the Numbers • • 
• • The Mae West Blog was started ten years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 2988th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

Source:http://maewest.blogspot.com/atom.xmlAdd to Google

• • Photo:
• • Mae West in 1932

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West